JSHA VS FLHA Part 1

Sometimes with all the safety talk going on, I forget that not everyone always knows what I’m talking about. I bring JSHA’s and FLHA’s up a lot. They’re one of the most valuable tools in the safety industry. Then it dawned on me… Some people might not know what I’m talking about. This is a terrifying thought but a real one. I worked on one site where there was a quick pre-work talk… mostly instructions for the day but no FLHA. When I asked about doing one, everyone looked at me like I had two heads. This wasn’t THAT long ago. So, sadly there may be some of you new to industry working on a site like this as well. For those workers and well… everyone, let’s take a few days to focus on one of the most important tools in your belt. 

 

JSHA and FLHA are not different names for the same thing. They each have their own purpose. JSHA stands for Job Site Hazard Analysis (keep in mind there are many names for both of these such as JSA, JHA and so on) This is completed by an employer for the entire site. If we want to get super technical here, the legislation in Alberta OH&S Code, Part 2, Section 7.1 states, “An employer must assess a work site and identify existing and potential hazards before work begins at the work site or prior to the construction of a new work site.” Section 7.2  further states, “An employer must prepare a report of the results of a hazard assessment and the methods used to control or eliminate the hazards identified.” This site wide hazard assessment can be viewed as the Job Site Hazard Assessment, or JSHA. They will use the hierarchy of controls to determine what is safe and practicable for each task. Come back tomorrow and we will go over the hierarchy of controls and all things JSHA and FLHA.

 

To learn even more about this topic head to our site and take our in depth Hazard Assessment course. It will provide you with some great tools for your safety belt and best of all… it’s free for limited time!

Donning and Doffing a Full Body Harness

This video shows the proper donning and doffing procedure for a full body harness. It provides step-by-step instructions on how to put-on, check fit, and take-off a safety harness used for fall protection.

Eye Bolts – Rigging and Signalling

Eye bolts are essential devices used in many lifting operations; but eye bolt failures continue to cause incidents especially when used for angular lifts. Here is a short video that gives valuable information every rigger should know when using eye bolts in their rigging operations.

How to Tie Knots (Bowline, Square, and Hitch Knots)

This video contains step-by-step instructions and video demonstrations for tying the bowline, square and hitch (clove hitch and half hitch) knots.

OH&S Act 2018 – Obligations of Worksite Parties

This short clip gives a brief overview of the 2018 OH&S Act in terms of the obligations of Worksite Parties (employers, supervisors, and workers) that came into effect on June 1, 2018.

Effects of H2S on the Human Body

Just the smallest amount of hydrogen sulfide can have huge effects on the human body. H2S is measured in parts per million. One PMM means one part gas per one million parts air, that’s nothing right? Wrong! H2S starts to wreak havoc at just 0.01 PPM. Let me break down just how deadly this gas really is. (Oh geez did I just say “deadly gas”?)

0.01 – 0.3 PPM – This is called the odour threshold and it smells like rotten eggs. You know the guy that eats egg salad every day in the lunch trailer… It smells like him.

1 – 20 PPM – The egg smell is even more offensive, causing nausea, tearing of the eyes and headaches.

20 -100 PPM – There is nose, eye, throat, lung and digestive irritation, accompanied by the loss of appetite and smell.

100 – 200 PPM – Nose, throat and lung irritation is now severe. Your sense of smell is completely gone now.

250 – 500 PPM – Fluid will begin to build up in your lungs.

500 PPM – Excitement, staggering and sudden collapse is possible now, along with loss of your memory for exposure time, dizziness, unconsciousness and death within a few hours.

500 – 1000 PPM – Respiratory paralysis, irregular heartbeat, collapse and death without rescue.

Over 1000 PPM – Immediate death. Game over, you didn’t have a chance.

Talking about “deadly gas” can be kind of funny, but H2S is absolutely no joke. Make sure you’re trained before entering any area that may contain any amount of H2S. For more information click here.

H2S – Typical Sites and Locations

Here is another snippet from our “soon to be released” H2S course. To keep our courses engaging, we include a mix of animation, video, pictures and set it all with a little background guitar for any music enthusiasts out there…well that part is a bit of a stretch. None the less, we hope you find it interesting and informative…some recent incidents are also included. It brings home the serious nature of H2S and why everyone should be trained.

H2S Safety Training (Sneak Peek)

Here’s a sneak peek at our H2S safety training online course soon to be released. Stay tuned for more safety video previews and information as to when the entire suite of new safety courses goes live.

Rigging and Signalling for Crane Operations – Intro (Sneak Peek)

Here’s a sneak peek of our Rigging and Signalling for Crane Operations online course. Stay tuned to see more soon.

Signalling for Crane Operations – Hand Signalling (Sneak Peek)

Here’s a sneak peek at our new Signalling for Crane Operations online course. Stay tuned to see more soon.